Help us protect and study the world's biggest fish!




Our work is possible with the generous support of:

How it works

The Wildbook for Whale Sharks photo-identification library is a visual database of whale shark (Rhincodon typus) encounters and of individually catalogued whale sharks. The library is maintained and used by marine biologists to collect and analyze whale shark sighting data to learn more about these amazing creatures.

The Wildbook uses photographs of the skin patterning behind the gills of each shark, and any scars, to distinguish between individual animals. Cutting-edge software supports rapid identification using pattern recognition and photo management tools. You too can assist with whale shark research, by submitting photos and sighting data. The information you submit will be used in mark-recapture studies to help with the global conservation of this threatened species.

8342 identified whale sharks

37996 reported sightings

5200 citizen scientists

126 researchers and volunteers


Encounters around the world

How can I help?

If you are not on site, there are still other ways to get engaged

Adopt a Whale Shark

  • Support individual research programs in different regions
  • Receive email updates when we resight your adopted animal
  • Display your photo and a quote on the animal's page in our database
Learn more about adopting an individual animal in our study

Meet an adopter:Wendy Campbell

Your whale shark research and conservation is important to me because we humans have a responsibility to leave the world a little better than we found it. We have destroyed so much life on earth that my grandchildren will never enjoy, so it's very important for survivors like the magnificent whale sharks to be understood and dare I say loved so that they will be there for my grandchildren!

Development

Wildbook for Whale Sharks is maintained and developed by Jason Holmberg (Information Architect) with significant support and input from the research community. This site is a flagship project of Wild Me's Wildbook and IBEIS open source projects. Dr. Simon Pierce provides scientific oversight and guidance.